Courses
 

D. Scott Mackay

Professor
Department of Geography
State University of New York
105 Wilkeson Quadrangle
Buffalo, NY 14261 USA

Phone: +1-716-645-0477
Fax: +1-716-645-2329

dsmackay at buffalo dot edu

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Courses Taught at UB

GEO 101: Physical Environmental Geography I

GEO 106: Earth Systems Science II
Global warming is constantly in the news – high temperatures, low lake-levels, big storms, and growing deserts. This four credit course examines past, present and future global warming by considering causes of warming, methods of modeling the future, predicted environmental and social impacts, and possible solutions. [Fall semesters; 180 undergraduate students]

see Course web site

GEO 347: Climatic Geomorphology
Recent events (e.g., flooding, mudslides, sinkholes, tsunamis) highlight the impact of land forming processes on human societies and socioeconomic systems. With these and other events in mind, this course examines how land surface forming processes interrelate with climate and land use. The first part of the course focuses on the role of climate, vegetation, and other factors on landform changing processes. The latter part considers how these processes are expressed in different systems, including humid and semi-arid watersheds, glaciated landscapes, permafrost, karst landscapes, and in coastal environments. [Spring semester; 30-40 undergraduate students]

see Course web site


GEO 561: Ecohydrology

This course deals with hydrologic and ecological mechanisms underlying climate-soil-vegetation dynamics and land-water dynamics. The evolution of terrestrial ecosystems depends on the need of vegetation for inputs of light, water, and nutrients. These inputs are variable in time and space, and how they are assimilated depends on plant characteristics and ecosystem structure. Thus, vegetation plays an active role as both cause and effect of the space-time dynamics of soil water and climate. Specific topics will include preferred states in spatial distribution of soil moisture, hydraulic limits to plant water use, ecological optimality, vegetation-hydrology linkages at catchment scales, carbon and nutrient cycling, and vegetation competition. [Fall semester; 5-15 graduate students]

see Course web site


Courses Taught at University of Wisconsin - Madison

  • Regional Hydrology
  • Remote Sensing Visual Image Interpretation and GIS Integration
  • Computational Aspects of GIS
  • Environmental Monitoring Practicum
  • Environmental Monitoring Seminar

Course Taught at the University of Toronto

  • Geographic Information and Mapping I


© D.S. Mackay 
Last Update: April 3, 2017